Taken Hostage Book Essay Sample

A Really Good Day

How Microdosing Made a Mega Difference in My Mood, My Marriage, and My Life

by Ayelet Waldman

Ayelet Waldman is a real handful; as people would have said once upon a time in my old New York neighborhood, "she's got a mouth on her."

Two years ago, when her novel, Love and Treasure, was left off the list of The New York Times 100 Notable Books of the Year, Waldman F-bombed the Times on social media. But, that incident was a mere ripple compared to the controversy Waldman sparked 12 years ago with "that essay." You know, the one in the "Modern Love" column of the Times in which she confessed to loving her husband, the novelist Michael Chabon, more than her four then-small children.

"That essay" has defined Waldman ever since as a loose cannon, and that reputation is sure to be reinforced by her nervy, funny and thought-provoking new book, A Really Good Day.

A Really Good Day is Waldman's first-person account of her month-long adventure microdosing LSD. In her preface, Waldman tells readers that she was diagnosed years ago with a variant of bipolar disorder. "For as long as I can remember," [she says] "I have been held hostage by the vagaries of mood. When my mood is good, I am cheerful, productive, and affectionate. I sparkle at parties, I write decent sentences, I have what the kids call swag. When my mood swings, however, I am beset by self-loathing and knotted with guilt and shame."

Waldman is not one to suffer those low moods in silence: She picks fights, shouts, and slams doors; she confesses that the sound of her husband chewing almonds even two rooms away in their house is enough to send her into a "blinding rage."

Ayelet Waldman is the author of The Mommy-Track Mysteries novels. Claire Lewis/Random House hide caption

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Claire Lewis/Random House

Ayelet Waldman is the author of The Mommy-Track Mysteries novels.

Claire Lewis/Random House

Waldman lives in Berkeley so there's nothing she hasn't tried in terms of mindfulness, meditation and yoga; along with the services of psychiatrists, psychologists and social workers. The list of psychotropic meds she's been prescribed and found wanting takes up almost a page-long paragraph of this memoir.

So it is that, in an effort to be less of a "difficult woman" to herself and her family, Waldman becomes intrigued by the work of James Fadiman, a psychologist and researcher who's chronicled the effects of microdosing LSD. (In other words, taking the drug in doses so low that it doesn't cause trippy hallucinations.)

Despite the fact that Waldman says she's so not "a free spirit" and despite the fact that she was once a public defender and law professor with a substantive knowledge of U.S. drug laws, she decides to give microdosing a try.

Waldman discreetly puts out the word that she's looking for "a source." Through a friend of a friend, she makes contact with a man who calls himself "Lewis Carroll" and he sends Waldman a package containing a blue dropper bottle allegedly full of LSD.

After squinting through her middle-aged reading glasses to make out the directions on the LSD testing kit she's ordered on Amazon, Waldman takes a leap of faith, swallows two drops from the mystery bottle, and jumps down the rabbit hole.

Maureen Corrigan

After squinting through her middle-aged reading glasses to make out the directions on the LSD testing kit she's ordered on Amazon, Waldman takes a leap of faith, swallows two drops from the mystery bottle, and jumps down the rabbit hole.

Which turns out to be a pretty mellow place. Waldman structures A Really Good Day as a wide-ranging diary of her microdosing month, during which she reports that her mood levels out, she gets an enormous amount of writing done, her frozen shoulder improves and she's so uncharacteristically chill that one of her kids finally asks, "Who are you?" Waldman has some sleep disruption, but nothing comes close to the bad side effects she's experienced on the prescription medication she's taken.

At this point, I hasten to add: Do not try this at home. LSD, of course, is still illegal. After a scary episode in which she tries to buy a fresh supply of LSD from someone other than "Lewis Carroll," even Waldman acknowledges that it's safer for her to quit trying to refill her blue dropper bottle.

A Really Good Day tells a really good story, one that will make readers think about how drugs get classified and how chemistry alters what we think of as essential personality traits. It's a story that only a woman who's lived most of her life being "a handful" would be gutsy enough to tell.

Taken Hostage: The Iran Hostage Crisis and America's First Encounter with Radical Islam3.6 · Rating details ·  150 Ratings  ·  13 Reviews

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took sixty-six Americans captive. Thus began the Iran Hostage Crisis, an affair that captivated the American public for 444 days and marked America's first confrontation with the forces of radical Islam. Using hundreds of recently declassified government documents, historian David FarberOn November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took sixty-six Americans captive. Thus began the Iran Hostage Crisis, an affair that captivated the American public for 444 days and marked America's first confrontation with the forces of radical Islam. Using hundreds of recently declassified government documents, historian David Farber takes the first in-depth look at the hostage crisis, examining its lessons for America's contemporary War on Terrorism.


Unlike other histories of the subject, Farber's vivid and fast-paced narrative looks beyond the day-to-day circumstances of the crisis, using the events leading up to the ordeal as a means for understanding it. The book paints a portrait of the 1970s in the United States as an era of failed expectations in a nation plagued by uncertainty and anxiety. It reveals an American government ill prepared for the fall of the Shah of Iran and unable to reckon with the Ayatollah Khomeini and his militant Islamic followers.


Farber's account is filled with fresh insights regarding the central players in the crisis: Khomeini emerges as an astute strategist, single-mindedly dedicated to creating an Islamic state. The Americans' student-captors appear as less-than-organized youths, having prepared for only a symbolic sit-in with just a three-day supply of food. ABC news chief Roone Arledge, newly installed and eager for ratings, is cited as a critical catalyst in elevating the hostages to cause celebre status.


Throughout the book there emerge eerie parallels to the current terrorism crisis. Then as now, Farber demonstrates, politicians failed to grasp the depth of anger that Islamic fundamentalists harbored toward the United States, and Americans dismissed threats from terrorist groups as the crusades of ineffectual madmen.



Taken Hostage is a timely and revealing history of America's first engagement with terrorism and Islamic fundamentalism, one that provides a chilling reminder that the past is only prologue....more

Paperback, 212 pages

Published August 13th 2006 by Princeton University Press (first published 2004)

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