The Misguided Zeal Of The Privacy Lobby Essay

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Free to Read Articles from December 1995 Part 1

  • 25 and Under
  • 3 Violent Incidents Raise Tension in West Bank
  • A 2d S.E.C. Official Quits
  • Abidjan Journal;Psychiatry's Terra Incognita: Healing in Africa
  • Abortion Foes Transfer Base From Houston
  • Abroad at Home;What Is at Stake?
  • A Budget Debate Not About Dollars, But About Whose Plan Makes Sense
  • Agencies Are Told to Brace for More Cuts
  • AIDS Patients Losing Money For Drugs
  • Alexander Takes Aim at G.O.P. Congress
  • Also of Note
  • Aristide Insists He Will Leave Office When Term Ends
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • Art in Review
  • ART REVIEW;2 Shows as Bookends to the Mondrian Exhibition
  • ART REVIEW;Seeing Franz Kline in Eastern Scrolls
  • A Storm Over Housing Codes
  • Barings Trader Pleads Guilty to 2 Charges in Singapore
  • BASEBALL;Franco's New Role: Guiding Mets' Youth
  • BASEBALL;Mets to Inspect Mexico Site
  • BASEBALL;Owners' Proposal Could Tax Payrolls
  • Billionaire's Gift Helps Columbia to Exceed Its Fund-Raising Goal
  • Biotech Surges On Cancer Trial
  • BOOKS OF THE TIMES;AIDS After Randy Shilts: Still Blame Enough for All
  • Bosnia Town Prepares for G.I.'s And Switch From War to Peace
  • Breach of Agreement Is Charged In Big California Health Deal
  • Broken Hill Of Australia Agrees to Buy Magma Copper
  • Browsing Among Memories of Performances Past
  • Budget Talks Face Hurdle Of Hostility
  • BUSINESS DIGEST
  • Castro All Hugs and Kisses On First Visit to Old Ally
  • CBS, Under Its New Owner, Plans a Series With Cosby
  • Chronicle
  • Chronicle
  • Clash of Careers For First Lady; Donna Hanover's 2 roles are not always separate
  • Cleaning Up Carting Together
  • COLLEGES;Alabama Penalties Eased; Miami Braces for Its News
  • Columbia Donations Reach $1.15 Billion
  • COMPANY NEWS;APPLIED MATERIALS TO TELL OF CHIP-MAKING ADVANCE
  • COMPANY NEWS;BOND FUNERAL HOME CHAIN MUST POST IS CUT
  • COMPANY NEWS;COCA-COLA TO DOUBLE ITS INVESTMENT IN RUSSIA
  • COMPANY NEWS;EXODUS OF TOP LOTUS OFFICIALS CONTINUES
  • COMPANY NEWS;MCN TO BUY GAS AND OIL PROPERTIES FOR $120 MILLION
  • COMPANY NEWS;METROMEDIA TO BUY ALLIANCE ENTERTAINMENT
  • COMPANY NEWS;RITE AID PLANS TO ACQUIRE REVCO FOR $1.8 BILLION
  • COMPANY NEWS;SONY RESTARTS WORK AT FIRE-DAMAGED BATTERY PLANT
  • COMPANY NEWS;TIME WARNER SELLS SOME OF ITS STOCK IN 3DO
  • COMPANY NEWS;TOYOTA PLANS TO BUILD NEW TRUCK PLANT IN INDIANA
  • Condoms Used in Safe-Sex Programs Are Recalled for Defects
  • Councilman to Take New Post
  • CREDIT MARKETS;Economic Data and Dollar Aid Rally in Bond Trading
  • Critic's Choice;24 Hours Of Action On AIDS
  • CURRENCY MARKETS; Germany Doesn't Change Rates, But Dollar Still Gains vs. Mark
  • DANCE REVIEW;An Evocation Of Nature
  • Dangerous Times for Haiti
  • DESIGN REVIEW;From an Era in Venice When Chic Was Illegal
  • Diner's Journal
  • Disruptions Planned Against Metro-North
  • DOLE BACKS PLAN TO SEND U.S. FORCE ON BOSNIA MISSION
  • Election Gain By Mubarak Is Under Fire
  • Esker K. Davis, 60, a Space Probe Official
  • Executive Changes
  • Fighting the River
  • File Search In 1992 Race Wasn't Illegal
  • FILM REVIEW;A Well-Dressed Saint In a Den of Wiseacres
  • FILM REVIEW;Hickok Did Not Go Gentle Into That Good Sunset
  • FILM REVIEW;Imagining Race Relations With Roles Reversed
  • FILM REVIEW;No Wonder the Guests Are Nervous
  • FILM REVIEW;The Effort That Turns a Teen-Ager Into a Dancer
  • Financing Allocated For Watershed Pact
  • For Children
  • For Germans, Villains in Forest Are Too Real
  • Fraud Charges for Boston Securities Dealer
  • Full Day's Work Till the Cows Come Home
  • FUTURES MARKETS;Coffee Drops to 1 1/2-Year Low; Natural Gas and Fuel Oil Fall
  • Gingrich Asserts Election Panel's Accusations That He Got Illegal HelpAre 'Totally Phony'
  • Girl's Death Resonates at Hearing on Secrecy Law in Child Abuse Cases
  • Good News! I.R.S. to Expand Direct Deposit Refund Service
  • Gravediggers' Claims Unsettle a Parish
  • Half-Million Cadillacs Recalled In Federal Pollution Settlement
  • HOCKEY; Elusive Twists in Muller Saga
  • HOCKEY;It May Have Been Ottawa, but on This Night Islanders Can Savor a Victory
  • Home Video
  • Howard Higman, Academic Impresario, Dies at 80
  • In America;Going Nowhere Fast
  • In a Parking Lot, a Quest For Corpses of 2 Mobsters
  • In a Shift, U.S. Grants Asylum For Mexicans
  • INSIDE
  • Inside Art
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;6th Financial Institution Collapses in Japan
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Banco di Napoli Gets Government Help
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Grand Met Net Up 3.7%
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Hanson Says Profits Surged 33% in Year
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;New European Airline?
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;South Wales Rejects Bid
  • Iraq Sanctions Kill Children, U.N. Reports
  • Japanese Stocks Higher
  • Key Rates
  • Last Chance
  • Lazard Freres to Leave Municipal Finance
  • Limited Use of Breast Cancer Drug Urged
  • In Russia, Change Must Take a Little Longer
  • Netanyahu Silenced Anti-Rabin Chants
  • Old Elegance Meets New Glitter on 57th Street
  • Private Prisons' Profit
  • Some Cabby Stories Have a Happy Ending
  • That's No Leak
  • We Enter Bosnia And Injure Europe
  • We Enter Bosnia And Injure Europe; A Political Ploy
  • We Enter Bosnia And Injure Europe;If Not Now, When?
  • What the Mockingbirds Taught Darwin
  • Market Place;U.S. utilities buy in Britain to learn deregulation for home use.
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;Familiar faces take center stage in public service campaigns created for World AIDS Day.
  • METRO DIGEST
  • Missouri Executes a Confessed Serial Killer
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Assembly Passes 3 Measures
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;City With a View Wary of Ads
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Doctor Pleads Guilty to Fraud
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Lawmaker on Mission to Bosnia
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Merger Will Cost 2,000 Jobs
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Move to Delay Emissions Tests
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;New Chief for Law Center
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Ragged and Risque Not in Style
  • NEWS SUMMARY
  • Nicaragua Volcano Threat
  • No Headline
  • On a Day of Peace in Belfast, Faiths Join to Cheer Clinton
  • On My Mind;The Blockades Of Taiwan
  • On Stage, and Off
  • Orders for Durables Fell 1% in October
  • Ottawa Unity Plan Draws Fire From Both Quebec and West
  • OUR TOWNS;Rebuffed and Ignored, a Tribe Waits to Be Confirmed as Indian
  • Packard Bell Denies Rumors Of Problems
  • Panel Clears Senate Minority Leader on an Ethics Complaint
  • Parents Fight Plan to Move Program for Gifted Students
  • Pataki Asserts Medicaid Rule Won't Change
  • Perot Party Gains in Maine
  • Philadelphia Police Arrest 2 in Slaying
  • PRO BASEBALL;Yankees Won't be Giving Strawberry a Second Chance
  • PRO BASKETBALL;Anderson Complicates Nets' Plan
  • PRO BASKETBALL;Anderson Interests Knicks and Kings
  • PRO BASKETBALL;Nets Grant Coleman's Wish With Trade to Sixers
  • PRO FOOTBALL;Giants Find an Oasis In Arizona's Desert
  • PRO FOOTBALL;Official Is Autograph Hound
  • PRO FOOTBALL;Rasheed Puts Naps Aside As He Prepares to Join Jets
  • PRO FOOTBALL;Rookie Tries to Channel His Considerable Intensity Into Games
  • Rabin Killer Denies Rabbi Approved Act
  • Rapper in Slain
  • Rapper Slain After Chase In Queens
  • Recipe for California's Political Chaos: Term Limits, Party Loyaltyand Power
  • Republican Whitewater Inquiry To Focus on Role of Mrs. Clinton
  • Restaurants
  • RESULTS PLUS
  • Retailers Had Weak Sales In November
  • Richard Halverson, 79, a Senate Chaplain
  • Rotating Work Shifts May Hurt Women's Hearts
  • Sara Lee Proposing to Sell Food Distribution Unit to JP
  • Softkey Gets an Ally in Hostile Takeover Bid
  • Specter Savors Failed Run for Roses
  • Sports of The Times;Exit Sign Best Thing For Darryl
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: BASEBALL;Dodgers Make Gagne Part of New Infield
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: BASKETBALL;Refs' Salaries at Issue
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: PRO FOOTBALL;Colts' Irsay Has Stroke
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: TRACK AND FIELD;Griffith Joyner's Plans
  • Stanley Adelman, 72, Repairer Of Literary World's Typewriters
  • Star Shine
  • SWIMMING;Furiously Treading Water
  • Talk About Weather: U.N. Says People Do Something About It
  • Team Folds in Memphis
  • The Last Stand
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;2 McCann Accounts Get New Agencies
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;Accounts
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;Burrell Group Buys DFA in New York
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;Doll Account Moved In-House by Mattel
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS: ADVERTISING -- ADDENDA;El Pollo Loco Names 5 Agencies to Review
  • THE MEDIA BUSINESS;Colgate Planning a Big Shift Of Its Advertising to Y.& R.
  • The Question Is: What Would Ken Think?
  • The Speaker's New Problem
  • TRANSACTIONS
  • TV WEEKEND;50's Revisited in New 'Bye Bye Birdie'
  • Union Vows A Rail Strike As Talks Stop
  • U.N. Votes to Make Haste Slowly in Retreat From the Balkans
  • U.S. Indicts 11 Brokers on Investor Fraud
  • U.S. Reopens Trade Dispute, Saying China Ignores Piracy
  • Wet Clay No Factor This Time
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;2 Salvador Suspects Reported in U.S.
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Archeologists Deny Cave Belonged to Maccabees
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Arms Bound for Libya Seized in Italian Raid
  • 20 Arrested In Credit Scam In California
  • 2 Big Setbacks Dealt to Merrill Municipal Unit
  • 2 Mortgage Rates Down
  • 43 Premieres for One Work
  • 7th House Democrat Switches to G.O.P.
  • ABOUT NEW YORK;A Quiet Auditor Leaves Yeshiva a Fortune
  • ACCORD REACHED FOR LIMITING SMUT ON THE INTERNET
  • A Day Without Art
  • Appeals Court Removes Judge in Oklahoma Bombing Case
  • Apple Prices Cut for Holidays
  • A Question of Blood and AIDS;Infected Youth Sues Doctor Over '84 Transfusion
  • Army Children Express Their Doubts
  • As Executions Increase, Appeals Go to the Public
  • As Papandreou Weakens, Prospects for His Successor as Greek Leader GetCloudier
  • At the Pentagon, An Afternoon Off
  • BASEBALL;Boggs May Shop Around If Yankees Remain Silent
  • BASEBALL;Snider Gets Probation and a Fine in Tax Scheme
  • BASKETBALL;Coleman May Renew Demand For Trade
  • BASKETBALL;Mourning Enjoys the Reunion
  • BASKETBALL;Nets Win Their First On the Road
  • Behind Rail Talks, Bitter Years Of Inequality for Track Workers
  • Behind the Masks: Salinas Expose Stuns Mexico
  • Beliefs
  • BOXING;Nelson Knocks Out Ruelas
  • Bridge
  • British Court Supports Bankers Trust in Derivatives Case
  • Budget Bargainer for Clinton Reaches a Defining Moment
  • BUSINESS DIGEST
  • Can Ann Taylor Dust Itself Off?;A Reatailer Is Paying a High Price For a Big Detour in Strategy
  • Caseworkers Pressured to Close Children's Files
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Child Abuse: Theory vs. Reality
  • CHRONICLE
  • CHRONICLE
  • Clinton's Peace Strategy;President Hopes to Do Well With Voters By Doing Good on the International Stage
  • Commuter Bus Lines and City Reach Pact With Drivers
  • COMPANY BRIEFS
  • COMPANY NEWS;ACCUSTAFF HAS AGREED TO PURCHASE GW CONSULTING
  • COMPANY NEWS;AST TO TRIM 530 MANUFACTURING JOBS IN HONG KONG
  • COMPANY NEWS;CINCINNATI MICROWAVE SHARES SLIDE AS MUCH AS 33%
  • COMPANY NEWS;CISCO BUYING A 4.4% STAKE IN OBJECTIVE SYSTEMS
  • COMPANY NEWS;COLUMBIA INTERNATIONAL TO SELL CABLE SYSTEMS
  • COMPANY NEWS;HFS FORMS VENTURE WITH INSIGNIA FINANCIAL GROUP
  • COMPANY NEWS;INMAC SHARES CLIMB SHARPLY ON ACQUISITION DEAL
  • COMPANY NEWS;KMART HAS DECIDED NOT TO SELL CANADIAN OPERATIONS
  • COMPANY NEWS;RAYCHEM ANNOUNCES REVAMPING AND PAYROLL CUTS
  • COMPANY NEWS;TRUBUNE IS SUED BY LEARNING COMPANY
  • Congressional Memo;2 Sides in Budget Talks Take the Road to Nowhere
  • Court Rejects Sculptors' Case
  • CURRENCY MARKETS;Dollar Falls vs. Mark and Yen, But Gains on Franc and Pound
  • Dakin B. Ferris, 69, Financial Services Innovator
  • Department for the Aging Loses Age-Bias Lawsuit
  • Division of Mostar Is Ended
  • Dublin Greets Distant Relative of the Old Sod
  • Ethics Panel Chief Is Linked To Group in Gingrich Inquiry
  • F.B.I. Revisits Earthly Theft of Moon Rock
  • FOOTBALL;2 Young Jets Find Some Good Fortune in Losing Season
  • FOOTBALL;Miami Takes Its Punishment Sooner, Rather Than Later
  • FOOTBALL;This Time, the Giants Don't Let a Close One Slip Away
  • FUTURES MARKETS;Crude Oil Prices Rise on Reports Saudi King Was Hospitalized
  • G.M. SALES OFF AS A CHRYSLER REPORTS A RECORD NOVEMBER
  • Golden Venture Refugees on Hunger Strike in California to ProtestDetention
  • Grace Weighs Alternatives To a Spinoff
  • Healthcare Groups Forge 'Partnership'
  • Helmets for Young Skaters
  • Herschel H. Hobbs, 88, Southern Baptist Leader
  • HOCKEY;Rangers' Fast Start Overcomes Colorado
  • HOCKEY;Some Spring-Like Checks In December
  • HORSE RACING;N.Y.R.A. Stops Its Signal And Gets Deal With OTB
  • Husband Of Nominee Questioned In Fraud Case
  • Indians Approach Sellout for Season
  • IN PERFORMANCE;CLASSICAL MUSIC
  • IN PERFORMANCE;CLASSICAL MUSIC
  • IN PERFORMANCE;CLASSICAL MUSIC
  • IN PERFORMANCE;DANCE
  • INSIDE
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;3 German Banks Take Interhotel Stakes
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Britain Reopens Cable Investigation
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Change at Barclays
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Kvaerner's Amec Stake
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Tobacco Business Merger Is Planned
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Toshiba's New Plant
  • INTERNATIONAL BRIEFS;Unilever Acquisition
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS;Italy's Stet to Update Russian Phone System
  • INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS;Singapore Sentences Leeson to 6 1/2 Years in Prison
  • Jack Oliphant, 71, Right-Wing Bomber
  • Jeffrey Lynn, 89, Actor in Leading-Man Roles
  • Job Action by Teamsters Hits Upper Harlem Line
  • Journal;Gates Goes Public
  • Journal of the Plague Years: Litany of Names at City Hall
  • Key Bosnia Question: Where Are Exits?
  • Key Rates
  • Catholic Church Must Remain True to Itself
  • Catholic Church Must Remain True to Itself;Women and Priesthood
  • Facing Up to Abortion And Reproductive Fact
  • Fingerprint System Can't Be Foolproof
  • Global Warming Trends Should Spur Us to Act, Not Delay
  • Guevara Never Lost Castro's Respect in Revolutionary Struggle
  • Hospice and Medicare
  • Lobbying, in the Sunlight
  • Louis Malle Recalled, At His Funeral in Paris
  • Volunteers at the Top
  • What Housing Policy?
  • Magellan Fund Sold Technology Shares
  • Magma Copper Stock Soars 29% on Huge Takeover Bid
  • Man With Rifle Arrested Near the White House
  • Maxwell Thurman, 64, General Who Led '89 Panama Invasion
  • Mayor's Pick For Market Omitted Data
  • METRO DIGEST
  • Milestone in the Civil Rights Movement
  • MUSIC REVIEW;What Jobim Knew: Small Is Beautiful
  • NATO Picks Spanish Foreign Minister for Secretary General
  • New Delhi Journal;Another Rushdie Novel, Another Bitter Epilogue
  • New Fine Leveled Against Oakley
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Flag to Honor Peacekeepers
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Grocer Charged With Hitting Boy
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Name of Killer, 15, Is Revealed
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Police Promotion Case Dismissed
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Rutgers Faculty Seeks Peace
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Speed Limit Will Not Exceed 55
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;State Reports 26,606 AIDS Cases
  • NEW JERSEY DAILY BRIEFING;Stolen Statues Sold for Scrap
  • NEWS SUMMARY
  • No Headline
  • Oregon's Hatfield to Retire After 5 Terms in Senate
  • O. Roy Chalk, 88, Entrepreneur With Diverse Holdings, Is Dead
  • Packwood to Be Consultant
  • Parade Bars Gay Church, Stirring Key West
  • Pataki Cuts Off Money for Projects Cuomo Approved, Saying They Don'tMeet Rules
  • Phar-Mor Founder Gets Long Sentence
  • Police See Connection in 3 Brooklyn Rapes
  • POP REVIEW;Seeming So Placid but Really So Obsessed
  • Prudential Unit May Be Sold
  • Purchasers Say Economy Slows
  • Rally Takes Long Bond's Yield to 2-Year Low
  • RESULTS PLUS
  • Rifkin, in Brooklyn, Admits Three More Murders
  • Senate Hearing Homes In On First Lady's Credibility
  • Senator Hatfield's Farewell
  • Sports of The Times;An Equal Exchange of Limitations
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: BASEBALL;Sutton and Niekro Head Hall Ballot
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: COLLEGE FOOTBALL;Heisman Tropy Invitations Extended to 5
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: HOCKEY;Bruins' Mullen to Miss 8-10 Weeks
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: PRO BASKETBALL;Washington Feels Lucky After Seizures
  • SPORTS PEOPLE: TRACK AND FIELD;Johnson Wins 2d Straight Owens Award
  • Stocks Mixed as Dow Is Up; Technology Issues Weaken
  • STRIKE TO PROTEST GOVERNMENT CUTS WIDENS IN FRANCE
  • Swooning (and Bidding) for Something of Sinatra's
  • Tap Dancer Arrested On Drug Charges
  • TENNIS;Sampras Shows Grittiness at Davis Cup Finals
  • Terrorism Bill Plan May Break Deadlock
  • The Burmese Charade
  • Transactions
  • Verdict on the Bush Passport Scandal
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;4 Guilty of Distributing H.I.V.-Infected Blood
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Apartheid-Era Minister Is Linked to Zulu Gangs
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Argentina Questions 12 In Blast at Jewish Center
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Aristide Plans to Marry A Former Speechwriter
  • WORLD NEWS BRIEFS;Saudi King Hospitalized; Test Results 'Reassuring'
  • ABOUT LONG ISLAND
  • After 17 Years, Simpson Will Leave Senate
  • Agency Is Defended
  • A LA CARTE;Of Wine Tastings, and Prix-Fixe Dinners
  • ALSO INSIDE
  • Anne's Mountain Range
  • A Noteworthy Collection
  • Anxiety 101: Taking Test To Attend Stuyvesant
  • ART;Renewed Recognition for the Modernist Works of Walt Kuhn
  • ART REVIEW;A Family of Women, Each to Her Own Medium
  • ART;Rube Goldberg's Universe: 'A' Tilts 'B,' Which Overturns 'C,' Which . . .
  • ARTS/ARTIFACTS;A Fashion Maker Looks Beyond Seventh Avenue
  • ART
  • A Sailor Finds His Angel
  • A Salute for a Comrade
  • ATLANTIC CITY;At the Casinos
  • ATLANTIC CITY;The T Word
  • BACKTALK;It Was a Conference With Character
  • BASEBALL;Martinez Eager To Know '96 Team
  • BASEBALL;McGriff Stays With Braves
  • BASEBALL;Psst . . . Showalter Had 2d Chance
  • BEHIND THE WHEEL/1996 Nissan Pathfinder;Leaving Bigger Tracks Along a Crowded Trail
  • BENEFITS
  • BEST SELLERS: December 3, 1995
  • BIRTH OF A VISION: A special report.;Files Show How Gingrich Laid a Grand G.O.P. Plan
  • Bosnian Officials Say They Mistrust French Peacekeepers
  • Both Parties' Genes Are Found in Deficit
  • British Bondholders May Sue in Singapore Case
  • Broad Poll Of the Public On Politica
  • BUSINESS BEST SELLERS
  • Butterflies in December
  • Calling for Answers To a Patient's Needs
  • Correction
  • Correction
  • Correction
  • Correction
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • Corrections
  • CHATTER;Changing Health Insurance?
  • Cheer Around the Country
  • CHILDREN'S BOOKS;Bookshelf
  • China's Buddha Complex
  • CHOICE TABLES;5 Roman Exemplars Of Cucina Creativa
  • Clair McCollough, 92, Executive Who Repaired TV's Reputation
  • CLASSICAL VIEW;Spinning Wild Fantasies on a Weird Science
  • Clinton Rallies Edgy Troops for Bosnia
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL;For Villanova, Small Men Come Up Big
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL: MEN;Comeback By Kansas Trips Up U.C.L.A.
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL;Seton Hall Sinks in Miami
  • COLLEGE BASKETBALL: WOMEN;Huskies Can Win, If Not Dominate
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL;Another Late Date With Glory For Army
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL;Gators Earn a Chance To Play for the Big 1
  • COLLEGE FOOTBALL;Texas Cliches Last Title As The S.W.C Ceases to Be
  • Colleges Told To Publish Sports Costs
  • Commercial Property: Retail;Stores Direct Their Feet to the Sunny Side Street
  • COMPASSION PLAY;Less Is More: Faith and Facts in Welfare Reform
  • CONNECTICUT GUIDE
  • COOKING
  • COPING;Handling It: Tales From a Cancer Hot Line
  • County Employs New Approach to Preserving the Environment
  • COVER STORY;Jupiter Is a Nice Place to Visit . . . But You Wouldn't Want to Live There
  • Craft Is Launched To Peer at the Sun
  • DANCE;Stepping Out With Stephen Foster
  • DANCE;The Life and Times Of an American Classic
  • David Briggs, 51, Neil Young Producer
  • Deficit Partnership
  • DESIGN VIEW;Well-Made Surfaces And the Conflicts Lurking Beneath Them
  • DIARY
  • DINING OUT;Appealing Good Looks and Lively Fare
  • DINING OUT;Warm and Inviting, Italian Fare With Flair
  • District of Columbia Is Paying Millions to Insure Former Workers
  • Diversity Pays Off in a Babel of Yellow Pages
  • DRIVING;Trouble Spots On the Roads
  • Dr. John H. C. Ranson, 57, Dies; Leader in Pancreatic Research
  • Drug Figure Loses Appeal Against U.S.
  • EARNING IT;Workaholics Aren't the Only Ones Who Hate Vacations
  • Easier Voter Registration Hasn't Raised Participation
  • EDITORS' CHOICE
  • Electronic Devices and Domestic Violence
  • Eli Morris Spark, 88, Professor of Law
  • ENDPAPER;BEAUTY REGIME
  • EVENING HOURS;Multiplication Tables (Five Times the Fun)
  • Ex-C.I.A. Agent Suspected in Italian Ring
  • Ex-Seoul Leader Arrested
  • FAST FORWARD;Really Remote Control
  • FILM VIEW;Honesty, Eloquence: Louis Malle
  • Finance Chief Is Appointed By Giuliani
  • FIRST PERSON;Sinatra on the Jukebox, Empanadas in the Shoe Store
  • FOOD;A Candied Delicacy From Italy For the Holidays
  • Foreign Affairs;Think Haiti
  • Foreign Islamic Fighters in Bosnia Pose a Potential Threat for G.I.'s
  • For Neptune, Winning a Title Is the Best Revenge
  • For the Good Old Boys, Getting a (Second) Life at 60
  • Four of a Kind
  • French Alpine Skiing: A Bumpy Ride
  • French Union Leaders Push To Make Strike Nationwide
  • Friends and Family Mourn Slain Model
  • FROM THE DESK OF;I Was a Victim of Data Base Mismanagement
  • F.Y.I.
  • GALILEO, PHONE HOME
  • GARDENING
  • GARDENING;Sing a Song of Spices, Cinnamon for Sure
  • Georgian Force Disbanded
  • GOLF;Dreams Draw Many To the PGA's Q School
  • GOOD EATING;Tabletop Drama: The Theater District
  • Habitats: Thornwood, N.Y.;Fixing Up a 255-Year-Old Westchester Farmhouse
  • Hailing Cabbies, Officially
  • Haitian Ex-Paramilitary Leader Confirms C.I.A. Relationship
  • Hard Times Persist in Sarajevo
  • Henry S. Dyer, 88; Test Expert Studied Role of the S.A.T.
  • His Career Path Is Plotted: Mostly Up
  • HOCKEY;Awakened Isles Beat the Devils
  • HOCKEY;Frustration in the Hockey Heartland
  • HOCKEY;Islanders Heard the Chanting, Now Don Maloney Is Gone
  • HOCKEY;Rangers and Verbeek on a Roll
  • How a Rabbi's Rhetoric Did, Or Didn't, Justify Assassination
  • How Hollywood Did a Deal
  • IN BRIEF;NEW JERSEY VOICES
  • IN BRIEF;On AIDS Awareness Day, State Educates Teen-Agers
  • IN BRIEF;School-Bus Drivers Testing Exercises to Shape Up Eyes
  • IN BRIEF;Surfing in December: More Sites, and a Correction
  • INDEX;ON THE TOWNS
  • In Iowa, Buchanan Tries to Convince Conservatives That He's Their Man
  • INSIDE
  • INSIDE
  • IN THE GARDEN;Seasonal Spices: How They Grow
  • In the Region: Connecticut;Factory-Outlet Centers Double Up on the Sound
  • INVESTING IT;Finding Lost Pensions
  • INVESTING IT;For Buffett Buffs, Clues From His Charity
  • INVESTING IT;In Airline Stocks, Shorter Flights Have Fewer Bumps
  • INVESTING IT;Whenever Banks Merge, It's Time to Check Insurance
  • Its Heart Is Still 7th Avenue;Garment Union Keeps Piece of Past
  • Jerome Cooper U.S. Soccer Builder, 81
  • JERSEY;For Young Smokers, a New Risk: the Law
  • Jewish Convention Urges One-Faith Training for Children
  • J. Frank Burke Candy Executive, 92
  • Judith Lane Rand Novelist, 64
  • Kangaroo Bounces Back
  • Kissing Bandit' of Queens Is Arrested
  • A Child Dies, and the System Tries to Hide
  • A Child Dies, and the System Tries to Hide;Everyone's Problem
  • A Cooper Creation Needs Clarification
  • A Green Groundswell
  • Alliance for Equality Is a Broad-Based Group
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Cover Story

The Lawyers Who May Run America

By Terry Carter and Stephanie Francis Ward

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It’s the guessing game that has Washington, D.C., buzzing: Which lawyers will be appointed to senior government positions by the next president?

Should Barack Obama win the race for the White House, the following attorneys are favorites to join his administration, according to dozens of interviews with people who know the candidate well. We’ve matched each to the job for which they are most often mentioned.

In the event of a Obama victory, consider it the morning line on the capital’s new establishment.

For a look at the lawyers who may join a McCain administration, click here.


ATTORNEY GENERAL

Eric Holder

Currently: Partner, Covington & Burling
Law school: Columbia (1976)

Holder and Obama have been friends since they hit it off at a dinner party in 2004. He is the consummate Washington insider—a familiar fixture in the Clinton administration, but well-known to Republican administrations as well. Best known as a prosecutor, Holder was fresh out of law school when he was assigned to the newly formed public integrity section of the Justice Department. There, he helped prosecute several high-profile defendants, including a judge, a diplomat, an assistant U.S. attorney and a leading organized crime figure.

President Reagan nominated him to a D.C. judgeship and he was later tapped by President Clinton to serve as D.C.’s U.S. attorney. In 1997, Clinton elevated him to the No. 2 job in the Justice Department, and he briefly served as acting attorney general in the Bush administration while nominee John Ashcroft was being confirmed. In 1999, Holder helped convince Republi­cans to scrap independent counsel investigations, successfully arguing before Congress that wrongdoing by public officials can, and should, be handled by the Justice Depart­ment. And should he be tapped as the nation’s chief law enforcement official, Republicans may ask him to revisit that.

Deval Patrick

Currently: Governor of Massachusetts
Law school: Harvard (1982)

Obama and Patrick aren’t just friends. They swim like a two-fish school. Both had fathers who deserted them as youngsters. Both are spellbinding orators and Harvard Law grads. And when Obama appropriated some of Patrick’s lines and manners into his speeches, the shared words and constructions were quickly acknowledged as the collaboration of friends.

Patrick clerked for a judge in the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, worked as an attorney for the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund and served in the Clinton administration as assistant attorney general in the civil rights division. Patrick has an extensive history of rights-related litigation, but he’s also served as general counsel for two major corporations—Texaco and Coca-Cola. Although he is only halfway through his term as governor, many believe he would be one of Obama’s top choices for AG, and Patrick would be hard-pressed to decline if asked.

WHITE HOUSE COUNSEL

Robert Bauer

Currently: Partner, Perkins Coie
Law school: Virginia (1976)

Robert Bauer
Courtesy Perkins
Coie

As a partisan regular with a street-fighter’s zeal, Bauer has earned a reputation among some Republicans as the “focus of all evil.” But they weren’t all that crazy about him in the Hillary Clinton campaign either. In March, Bauer crashed a Clinton campaign conference call with reporters, calling into question a charge that Obama workers had violated Texas party rules during post-primary caucuses. An early Obama supporter, Bauer is a regular contributor to the Huffington Post website.

He helped represent Minority Leader Tom Daschle during the Senate impeachment trial of Bill Clinton and was general counsel to Bill Bradley’s presidential campaign. He’s considered one of the nation’s top experts on the intricacies of campaign finance and writes about it regularly on More Soft Money Hard Law, a law blog devoted to campaign finance.

Mark C. Alexander

Currently: Professor, Seton Hall Law School
Law school: Yale (1992)

This former litigator with Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher may have a day job as a constitutional scholar, but Alexander’s resumé is rooted in ground-level politics. His father, Clifford Alexander, was secretary of the Army under President Carter.

He is a senior adviser to Obama’s campaign, having served as issues director for Bill Bradley’s 2000 presidential drive.

He’s had teaching gigs as a Fulbright scholar in Spain and as a visiting scholar at Yale Law School. He’s also worked for Democratic Sens. Ted Kennedy and Howard Metzenbaum; was general counsel for Newark, N.J., Mayor Corey Booker’s 2006 campaign; and even served a two-year term as an elected official in his hometown, Washington, D.C.

SECRETARY OF STATE

Greg Craig

Currently: Partner, Williams & Connolly
Law school: Yale (1972)

Why not a lawyer for State? To Washington insiders, Craig is smart, smooth, more widely experienced and more level-headed than most. After all, he’s a protégé of quintessential insiders Edward Bennett Williams and Joseph Califano. As senior adviser to Secretary of State Madeleine Albright, he was director of policy planning, and served quietly as a go-between on Tibetan issues between the Dalai Lama and the Chinese government. As a staffer for Ted Kennedy in the mid-1980s, he played a key role in getting economic sanctions imposed against the apartheid government of South Africa, and he later represented Elián González’s father in the controversial 2000 custody battle.

SECRETARY OF DEFENSE

Richard Danzig

Currently: Adviser, Obama campaign
Law school: Yale (1971)

Having served as secretary of the Navy in the Clinton administration and as a top deputy in the Defense Department, Danzig knows his way around the Pentagon. He was a Rhodes scholar and a clerk at the U.S. Supreme Court for Justice Byron White. While heading the Navy, he was instrumental in developing a personnel system that treated recruits as highly skilled technical workers. In recent years he has become better known for his take on U.S. Middle East policy. Explaining a need to change the U.S. approach to the region at a foreign policy convention, Danzig—who holds a doctorate in philosophy from Oxford—invoked the cultural lessons of Winnie the Pooh and Luke Skywalker: If a tactic is causing too much pain, it’s time to try something else.

NATIONAL SECURITY ADVISER

Mark Brzezinski

Currently: Partner, McGuireWoods
Law school: Virginia (1991)

Mark Brzezinski
Courtesy McGuire
Woods LLP

Brzezinski served as director of Southeast European affairs for the National Security Council during the Clinton administration. His father, Zbigniew Brzezinski, was national security adviser under Carter. The younger Brzezinski—a Fulbright scholar with a J.D. and a Ph.D. in political science from Oxford—is an expert on Russian and Eurasian affairs in his own right.

SECRETARY OF HOMELAND SECURITY

Janet Napolitano

Currently: Governor of Arizona
Law School: Virginia (1983)

Napolitano got her first career boost when President Clinton made her U.S. attorney for the District of Arizona. It came after Napolitano helped represent Anita Hill during the Clarence Thomas hearings. Napolitano went on to become Arizona attorney general. As governor of McCain’s home state, Napolitano endorsed Obama a few weeks before the Arizona primary and was rewarded with a featured speech at the Democratic convention.

Though it’s known she would love to become U.S. attorney general, many feel she would bring a different vibe to the Department of Homeland Security. As governor of a border state, she’s pushed for immigration reforms that would include a path to citizenship for those already here illegally; but she was also the first governor to deploy National Guard troops along the Mexico border, an idea later adopted by the Bush administration.

DIRECTOR OF THE FBI

Ronald K. Noble

Currently: Secretary general, Interpol
Law school: Stanford (1982)

Noble, 51, is a career prosecutor and law enforcement officer whose reputation for integrity and forward thinking has vaulted him to one of the top jobs in international law enforcement. After a stint in the Justice Department, he was tapped as assistant Treasury secretary by Bill Clinton in 1993. One of his first tasks was to investigate the disastrous federal raid on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas. Noble’s report blamed structural and procedural problems on his own agencies. A year later, he became the Trea­sury Department’s undersecretary for enforcement, a newly created position responsible for overseeing an array of agencies, including the Secret Service, U.S. Customs and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms.

Before leaving Treasury in 1996, he advocated for a more aggressive approach to money laundering by criminal and terrorist organizations. He was elected in 2000 to run Interpol, becoming the first American to head the international police organization headquartered in Lyon, France. Now in his second term as secretary general, Noble is credited for changing the once deliberate agency into a 24/7 clearinghouse for intelligence and information on terrorist and criminal operations in 186 member nations around the world.

SECRETARY OF COMMERCE

Ron Kirk

Currently: Partner, Vinson & Elkins
Law school: Texas (1979)

When the U.S. Chamber of Commerce hosted a reception for Texas Democrat Kirk in 2002 at its D.C. headquarters, GOP leadership in the Senate was livid. At the time, Kirk was giving Republican John Cornyn—the eventual winner—a good run for the seat vacated by Phil Gramm, and they considered the reception an endorsement.

Kirk has made a career of crossing race and party lines, a lesson gleaned from working for Lloyd Bentsen and as Texas secretary of state. Kirk, now 54, was the first black mayor of Dallas, elected in 1995 by a landslide and re-elected four years later by an even greater margin. An early and key adviser for Obama in Texas, Kirk stumped for him in several primary states. As top-level liaison between the White House and the business community, he would bring a broad range of lobbying and coalition-building skills.

SECRETARY OF HUD

Valerie Jarrett

Currently: President & CEO, Habitat Co.
Law School: Michigan (1981)

After his wife, Michelle, Valerie Jarrett is Obama’s closest, most trusted adviser. Though she is black, Jarrett’s background could hardly be more different from Obama’s. She grew up well-off in Chicago, her father an internationally known research physician and her mother an expert in early childhood development. It’s brainpower that makes for the mind-meld between them. Jarrett heads a large apartment development and management concern that also is the court-appointed receiver of Chicago public housing.

If and when Tom Daschle decides he doesn’t want to be chief of staff, she’d be a natural selection there. In 1991, as deputy chief of staff to Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley, she hired Michelle Robinson, who was already engaged to Obama. Obama respects her knowledge, opinions and experience as a problem solver—she tells it to him straight. And her resumé is a quarry: big rocks, no sand. She’s been chair of the Chicago Transit Board and the Chicago Stock Exchange and a member of the board of directors at the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago.

DIRECTOR OF U.S. CITIZENSHIP AND IMMIGRATION SERVICES

Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar

Currently: Professor, Stanford Law School
Law school: Yale (1997)

Mariano-Florentino
Cuéllar
Courtesy Stanford
Law School

At Stanford, where he received a doctorate in political science to go along with his law degree, Cuéllar’s work focuses on how organizations manage complex problems involving criminal justice, international security and government regulation.

He’s been an adviser to the U.S. Treasury Department and has published papers on subjects as wide-ranging as money laundering and the International Criminal Court.

Cuéllar advises the Obama campaign on many of these issues, and counsels on its efforts to reach Latino voters. He believes that immigration problems are the function of a failed bureaucracy carrying out misguided policies that reflect neither the country’s values nor its needs. And in an Obama administration, he may get the chance to put his philosophy to work.

SOLICITOR GENERAL

Kathleen M. Sullivan

Currently: Partner, Quinn Emanuel Urquhart Oliver & Hedges
Law school: Harvard (1981)

Kathleen M. Sullivan
Courtesy Harvard
Law School

Sullivan, 53, was dean of Stanford Law School from 1999 to 2004, and in private practice she’s represented a wide variety of corporate clients and trade associations. But she may be more widely known for her pro bono work in high-profile cases involving civil rights and civil liberties. Considered a constitutional scholar with the ability to find clarity in complex legal concepts, Sullivan has argued four cases before the Supreme Court. She now chairs the national appellate practice group at Quinn Emanuel and is licensed to practice in California, Massachusetts and New York. Sullivan still teaches at Stanford, but she counts as her mentor Harvard professor Laurence Tribe, an avid Obama supporter.

WHITE HOUSE DOMESTIC POLICY ADVISER

Cass R. Sunstein

Currently: Professor, Harvard Law School
Law school: Harvard (1978)

Cass R. Sunstein
Photo courtesy
University of
Chicago Law School

Obama is known to seek ad­vice on complex subjects from those he believes to be exceptionally smart, rather than those who are just politically con­nect­ed. Sunstein—who has been called a “one-man think tank”—is one of those he consults. Obama knows and trusts Sunstein, with whom he taught at the University of Chicago Law School, and would probably like to clone him for several different jobs. He’s a libertarian and a judicial minimalist whom Obama might be tempted to nominate to a Supreme Court slot. Earlier this year, Obama sought Sunstein’s guidance on warrantless surveillance of international telephone calls.

Sunstein has coined the “nudge” theory in a recent book co-authored with a behavioral economist. The approach involves nudging behavior in certain ways, but leaving options—e.g., automatically enrolling employees in 401(k) savings plans but letting them opt out. Sunstein is no ideologue. He’s supported a number of President Bush’s judicial nominees, including Michael McConnell for the 10th Circuit and John G. Roberts Jr. for chief justice.

SECRETARY OF THE EPA

Robert M. Sussman

Currently: Retired partner, Latham & Watkins
Law school: Yale (1969)

Before retiring from Latham & Watkins, Sussman represented a wide variety of corporate and trade association clients before government regulatory bodies on issues involving environmental rules and toxic torts. He was deputy administrator of the EPA early in Clinton’s first term and then went on to chair the environmental law practice group at Latham & Watkins. A senior fellow at the left-leaning Center for American Progress and a member of the board of directors of the Environmental Law Institute, Sussman is a highly regarded expert on the practical aspects of energy policy and climate change.

ASSISTANT ATTORNEY GENERAL, CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION, DOJ

Charles Ogletree

Currently: Professor, Harvard Law School; director, Criminal Justice Institute
Law school: Harvard (1978)

Ogletree was an adviser to the Black Law Students Association when Obama arrived at Harvard Law, and Obama has long cited him as a mentor. Ogletree’s in­terest in civil rights and racial disparities in the criminal justice system made him a natural choice as Obama’s adviser on black issues in the campaign.

When the NAACP believed it was obligated to support Clarence Thomas in his confirmation battle for the Supreme Court, Ogletree wrote a 30-page report that changed its mind. The 55-year-old professor could be Obama’s choice to head the Justice Department’s civil rights division, perhaps with a close eye on its voting section, which some Democrats believe has been used to suppress minority voting in recent years.

U.S. SUPREME COURT

Diane Wood

Currently: Judge, 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
Law school: Texas (1975)

Diane Wood
Photo by Lloyd
DeGrane

Judge Wood reminds some of Justice Antonin Scalia; in her opinions, like his, seeds are often planted for future cases. A Clinton appointee to the appeals court, Wood is seen as one of the country’s smartest judges. She’s a liberal who has authored a fair amount of high-profile dissents in the conservative 7th Circuit. In 2002, one such case regarded an Indiana law mandating in-clinic counseling for wom­en seeking abortions. Bucking the majority, Wood wrote that the law was burdensome to women, particularly those in rural areas.

Wood clerked for Justice Harry Blackmun and practiced at Washington, D.C.’s Covington & Burling. She entered academia in 1980, first going to Georgetown Law Center and then to the University of Chicago, where she has been a member of the faculty since 1981. An expert on antitrust litigation, Wood served as a deputy assistant attorney general in the antitrust division of the Justice Department during the early years of the Clinton administration. She joined the 7th Circuit in 1995.

Seth Waxman

Currently: Partner, WilmerHale
Law school: Yale (1977)

Seth Waxman
Courtesy
WillmerHale

If Waxman just showed up in robes one day on a bench at First Street and East Capitol, it is possible some old hands wouldn’t do a double-take. Having argued more than 50 cases before the high court, he’s been a fixture there for years. Now 57, Waxman is a former solicitor general. In private practice he’s represented corporate clients and financial institutions. But he’s also argued successfully for basic rights of habeas corpus on behalf of detainees at Guantanamo Bay.

After clerking for a federal judge in D.C., Waxman spent 16 years as a litigator with the now-defunct boutique firm of Miller, Cassidy, Larroca & Lewin. He now heads the appellate and Supreme Court practice group at WilmerHale. Justice John Paul Stevens once called Waxman the most brilliant young lawyer he’d ever heard. Should Stevens retire, Waxman just might take his place.

Elena Kagan

Currently: Dean, Harvard Law School
Law school: Harvard (1986)

Elena Kagan
Courtesy Harvard
Law School

In 1999, President Clinton tapped Kagan for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, only to have the nomination blocked by the Senate Judiciary Committee, then controlled by Republicans. But many think an Obama administration wouldn’t hesitate to tap her for a vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court. As dean, she managed to steer Harvard Law’s first-year curriculum from a 130-year-old case law approach to a more modern problem-solving model, gaining unanimous approval for the plan in a 2006 faculty vote. Kagan, 48, whose academic work focused on First Amendment issues and administrative law, is considered a skilled con­sensus builder. She clerked for Judge Abner Mikva in the D.C. Circuit and Justice Thurgood Marshall in the Supreme Court, and held a series of policy positions in the Clinton administration.

Sonia Sotomayor

Currently: Judge, 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
Law school: Yale (1979)

Sonia Sotomayor
Photo by Hispanic
PR Wire

A political centrist, the Bronx-born Sotomayor has been re­garded as a potential high court nominee by several presidents, both Republican and Democrat. Reared by her widowed mother after the death of her father, a tool-and-die worker, she has an attractive life narrative and an even more attractive resumé.

She was an editor of the Yale Law Review, did heavy lifting as a prosecutor under legendary New York County District Attorney Robert Morgenthau, and worked in private practice as an intellectual property litigator.

She was first appointed to the federal bench by President George H.W. Bush, then to the appeals court by President Clinton. In 1995, she won the gratitude of baseball fans by issuing an injunction against team owners, setting the stage for the end of the eight-month strike that led to the cancellation of the 1994 World Series.

For a look at who may join a McCain administration, click here.


Correction

In "The Lawyers Who May Run America," the profile of Robert M. Sussman should have referred to his potential post as administrator of the EPA, not secretary.

The Journal regrets the error.

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